Sixteen Chicks and a Kit

It’s only Tuesday and it’s already a busy week.

On Monday, we received a call from the Pandora branch of the United States Postal Service.

“There is,” a woman explained, ” a package for you.” Long pause. “And it’s talking.”

Chicks TiredThe chicks we’d ordered late last winter had arrived: five Black Australorps, five Black Giants and, as it turns out, six (though we only ordered five) Buff Orpingtons. Now ordinarily we don’t buy the animals that live here. There are more than enough domestics out there in need of a different situation that we don’t have to. But chickens? Well, they hold a special place in my heart and, frankly, they feed us. Not with their bodies; we’re vegetarians. But we have absolutely no issue with eating the eggs they produce, Chicksparticularly since the eggs they lay are infertile. This is not to say that we don’t take in wayward chickens. We do and have: Barbara the Australorp, Karen the Rhode Island Red and Big Girl, the Ameraucana,  just to name a few. But there’s something about raising a chicken from virtually her first breath. At least, there is for me.

Then, on Tuesday, today, we received a call from Nature’s Nursery Center for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation Education. A couple in our county had found an orphaned red fox kit and were looking for assistance. I met Rachel and Andy in Ottawa in the parking lot of the local Rite Aid. They explained that they’d found him huddled next to a dead sibling and kept a watch out for the mother. 003When nearly two days had passed without an appearance, they took the kit in and contacted NN, which in turn called us. We provided him with a little watered down formula, which he gladly drank, and, since he was severely dehydrated, gave him a subcutaneous injection of sterile saline solution. So he’s here for the interim. Tomorrow, we’ll try him on a slurry of soft cat food and formula.

From there, thanks to Rachel and Andy, the sky’s the limit.

3 thoughts on “Sixteen Chicks and a Kit

  1. Thank You so much for taking in the kit, I greatly appreciate it. I’m glad to know he is in good hands now and will be taken very good care of!!!!!! Hope you continue posting updates of him so I know how he’s doing. Thanks again!!!!!! Rachel

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    • He’s doing phenomenally well. He responded to the hydration therapy and started eating solid foods almost right away. We transported him up to Nature’s Nursery on Friday where he will get the best of care. Laura Zitzelberger, operations director at the facility, is working to find either littermates to bring to NN or a facility that already has kits so that he can grow up with others of his kind. Getting him with other kits reduces the possibility that he’ll become imprinted on humans. Should that happen, they’ll not be able to release him back into the wild where he belongs, so wish her well in her efforts.

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